LOTT Clean Water Alliance

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LOTT Clean Water Alliance is a non-profit interjurisdictional corporation that is organized to provide wastewater management services for the cities of Lacey, Olympia, Tumwater and Thurston County. Services include wastewater treatment, reclaimed water production, and long-range planning. LOTT’s facilities include two treatment plants, three pump stations, and sewer interceptor and reclaimed water distribution pipelines.  

Reclaimed Water

The Water Utility is coordinating with LOTT to provide access to reclaimed water to our residents and businesses.  Planning for reclaimed water is underway, as our sewer treatment provider and reclaimed water producer, the LOTT Clean Water Alliance, prepares to bring reclaimed water to our community.  Reclaimed water is treated to Class A Reclaimed Water standards – water that is clean enough for public contact and almost any use except drinking. It's ideal for many high-demand non-drinking purposes, allowing communities to stretch their water supplies by matching the type of water they use to actual needs. Class A Reclaimed Water can be used for a wide variety of uses, including: 

  • Irrigation (golf courses, parks, and landscaping)
  • Commercial and industrial processes
  • Dust suppression
  • Decorative fountains and ponds
  • Streamflow and wetland enhancement
  • Groundwater recharge

A reclaimed water storage tank and future irrigation system installation  are planned for the Tumwater Valley, for use on the municipal golf course. 

Reclaimed Water Storage/T Street Park

Groundwater Scientific Study

The City of Tumwater is participating with our partners at the LOTT Clean Water Alliance to take an in-depth look at infiltrating reclaimed water within our communities.  For more information multi-year, extensive study, visit the LOTT Clean Water Alliance Reclaimed Water Study.

Urban Density Septic System Review

On June 29, 2011, fifteen elected officials from the cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater, and Thurston County gathered to discuss septic systems and related impacts to our local water resources.  The goals of the summit were to develop a common understanding of key issues associated with on-site septic systems in high density areas and the scope of these issues in our communities; review existing policies and programs related to septic systems and their conversion to the sewer system; examine the effectiveness of those existing policies and programs; and determine if there is interest in developing a cooperative or collective approach to addressing the issues.

Since that initial gathering, the staff from each of the local jurisdictions have been meeting to develop a deeper understanding of wastewater issues facing our collective communities, define a current inventory of septic systems, review capitol programs to extend sanitary service to the urbanized areas and examine policies that the future of our communities rely upon for safe, clean water – for drinking and the environment.